The All-Time Gotham Baseball Team: Behind The Plate, Behind The Scenes

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As we get closer to the naming of the All-Time Gotham Baseball Team, to be announced at an upcoming event at Foley’s NY, which was named Best Baseball Bar in NY by Gotham Baseball magazine back in 2011, we do have a few selections that need to be made.

The ballot for catcher was very difficult to create; some fans will be irritated with the exclusion of Mike Piazza from the ballot, while others might be surprised that Hall of Fame catcher Bill Dickey is absent as well. Piazza was one of the great offensive players the Mets ever had, true, but Carter’s handling of the Mets pitching staff gave him the edge to our panel of experts. As for Dickey, Berra was simply a better player.

The Catchers


The rest of the ballot is even more subjective than the rest of the entire ballot, and probably will be split along fan loyalty lines, but we have been surprised by this type of voting before. In any event, we’ve allowed each ballot to have a write-in option, so if we’ve omitted any candidate for any spot, fee free to do so.

No Durocher? No Hodges? No Joe McCarthy?

No.

The Managers


Some will say that the greatest GM in Mets history isn’t even on this list, but I’ll let the ones who think that write in his name. As for Chub Feeney, though he never actually held the title of GM for Horace Stoneham, someone had to run things while Stoneham was “in his cups”.

The GM


I figure the owner’s ballot was going to create some controversy as well. No Big Stein? The O’Malley? REALLY? Hard to argue with results. This is “pro” sports.

The Owner


Finally, ever team needs a home. Which legendary ballpark would you choose to have this legendary team play in?


And that’s that.

Please share this ballot with your baseball-loving friends!

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7 thoughts on “The All-Time Gotham Baseball Team: Behind The Plate, Behind The Scenes

    Tim Reid said:
    December 30, 2012 at 3:02 pm

    The House That Ruth Built! … The Greatest Stadium since The Coliseum of Rome.

    Tim Reid said:
    December 30, 2012 at 3:30 pm

    I vote for Number 8 – Yankee Immortal Bill Dickey – the man who taught Yogi how to catch. No doubt Yogi & Campy belong at the top, too, but, for me, as great as they were, Dickey was an even better catcher & team leader. It’s much like choosing between. DiMaggio, Mantle & Mays. You can’t go wrong.

      Tommy Faherty said:
      December 30, 2012 at 4:22 pm

      Great vote Tim…Dickey deserves the recognition. His name should have been listed with the.others.
      Tommy Faherty

    gored82 said:
    December 30, 2012 at 5:09 pm

    It’s ridiculous to exclude Mike Piazza from such a catcher ballot. You must consider a catcher’s entire job – defense, handlng pitchers, and hitting. Gary Carter would be Piazza’s backup on any alltime Mets team.

      Mark Healey responded:
      January 2, 2013 at 2:05 am

      Considering defense is exactly why Carter is on ballot over Piazza…clearly a better defensive player and a three-time GG award winner.

        gored82 said:
        January 3, 2013 at 12:01 am

        But Piazza wasn’t that much worse defensively and was a far greater hitter, plus he played longer and had more great seasons in NY. Very bad call to pick Carter over Piazza.

    Keven E. Barton said:
    January 19, 2013 at 9:32 am

    It is my belief the baseball writers still do not know how to handle relief pitchers/firemen/closers with regards to being a legitimate position, and as to whether the Save stat is an anomaly. When the Save rule was changed into its modern form, yes, it changed things considerably. The age of the Goose Gossage type fireman was over. But that is a separate debate. Fact is, Lee Smith was of the most fearsome pitchers opposing batters ever had the displeasure of facing. He was big, intimidating on the mound, highly effective, and one of the most dominant players at his position for at least a ten year period. He retired as the all-time Saves king, and is still ranked third on the list. He retired after the 1997 season, so it can be argued his accomplishments as a closer are withstanding the tests of time. He is one of only five closers to surpass 400 saves in a career. It is time to open up the doors to a legitimate and dominant closer of the day.

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